Tag Archives: measured drawings

Malcolm X Park aka Meridian Hill Park

Meridian Hill Park

Meridian Hill Park

I just completed this project today, which was somewhat unique in its large footprint. The task was to make drawings of the perimeter wall around the entirety of Meridian Hill Park in Washington, DC.  Below is a satellite image showing the size of the park relative to its neighborhood.

Meridian Hill Park

Meridian Hill Park

I prepared drawings at eighth scale and organized them onto seven sheets.  This model required well over a hundred photographs. Below are a few sheets showing the linework.

Meridian Hill Park Perimeter Wall-1

Meridian Hill Park Perimeter Wall-2

Meridian Hill Park Perimeter Wall-3

Meridian Hill Park Perimeter Wall-4

Meridian Hill Park Perimeter Wall-6

Emmanuel Truss Layout

Emmanuel Truss Layout

an optically rectified image

Just as the last post was NOT a picture of a laser point cloud, this is a rectified image that is NOT derived through photogrammetry… Rather is is a wide angle shot that has been optically corrected to match real world conditions through perspective correction and parallax removal. The point is, though, that this photo can behave like a drawing – offering quantitative data in the same way my photogrammetric work can do. With a little additional field work and a little tweaking in Photoshop (or the Gimp or whatever raster editing software you have) , this could become a reasonably accurate hybrid drawing.  Conceptually, this approach can offer just about any architect or preservationist out there the benefits of photogrammetry without having to get “all the way in the water.”  Of course, not every structure offers itself up to this approach, but I think its interesting that it is the idea of mixing photography and measured drawings that is powerful: it is an approach that grows out of our profession (after all the basis of HABS is the measured drawing and the photograph) rather than a technology that is applied to it.  And it is low cost and widely available!

This cute little warehouse is located in Staunton, VA and has most of its upper floors available in case anyone is looking for a great place to locate a new business!

Point Cloud

Ho Ho Ho

Merry Christmas! In fact this is not a point cloud created by a laser station – but it sure does look like one.  It is actually just the fruits of labor from one enthusiastic home decorator.

Photo used with permission, shot by “Flamin’ Mo'” – http://www.flickr.com/photos/flaminmo/

2 boards prepared to illustrate hybrid drawing concept

Board 1

Board 2

completed line drawings

Trinity Episcopal Church

Overview of Sheets prepared for Trinity Episcopal Church in Renssalaerville, NY

Drawing with a few rectified images "unfrozen" in the AutoCAD drawing.

more progress

Drawing laid out on six sheets to include exterior and interior elevations, plans and building sections

Andrea Pozzo

2D Descriptions of 3D conditions

2D Descriptions of 3D conditions

What I’m talking about…

Andrea Pozzo says it all with this great drawing.

Technical Elevation Drawings – exterior and interior

Exterior Elevations

Exterior Elevations

Here I am posting a few drawings from a project completed about 18 months ago.  These drawings depict the existing conditions of the Luzerne County Courthouse which is located in Wilkes-Barre, PA. More on the building can be found here.  I prepared these for a team of architects and engineers who were to conduct a survey of these surfaces in preparation for an extensive masonry and stone rehabilitation project.  It is a beautiful building with a grand atrium reaching up through the building.  I also did drawings of this interior space.

Interior Elevations

Interior Elevations

I am posting these to show that, for all the value of rectified imagery, point clouds, three dimensional models – sometimes the most apt documentation is the relatively “old school” approach of using 2-D drawings to depict 3-D conditions through plan elevation and section.  In the end, the documents that I have prepared for clients over the years have had to pass this test: Will these drawings help my team to communicate easily together when assessing and discussing the problems and solutions at hand with a given building?  Will these drawings help me to accuractly assess the scope of work involve – and, will I beable to use them to communicate with and direct the contractors in the field who are doing the actual work to the building?

Earlier this week I was giving a presentation to students at the University of Virginia.  I started off showing them work that I did 15 years ago when everything was more or less analog in nature, later showing how fantastic it is now to be able to merge raster and vector data together digitally. And then I thought of these drawings and how deftly drawings can handle such complex forms with precision and efficiency.  As an industry, we are doubtless moving towards wider use of three dimensional modeling and Building Information Modeling (BIM) – yet I admit to having a fondness for the “old school” approach that I cut my teeth on, so to speak.

View of building exterior

View of building exterior

View through atrium to dome

View through atrium to dome

Photogrammetry of Ruins

Rosewell Ruins

Rosewell Ruins

In 2005 While I was running the digital documentation studio for Frazier Associates I enjoyed working on this challenging project for the Rosewell Foundation.  My task was to create accurate, architectural documentation of the  remaining masonry walls of this once grand house on the York river in Gloucester County, Virginia. You can read more about the house here.

Documenting ruins is a little different than a standing building.  The goal is less about presenting a description of building in its “platonic essence” and more about presenting it as it actually is at this moment in time.  Capturing the way a wall, tower, or chimney is leaning becomes rather important!  To this end, I prepared the building prior to the photo shoot by fixing special targets that could establish a level datum line (using a laser level).

Rosewell Documentation (interior sufaces)

Rosewell Documentation (interior sufaces)

The drawings and photographs produced for this project were used by architects Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker to create a “Blueprint for the Preservation of the Ruins at Rosewell” which consisted of a history, an structural analysis, an archaeological report, and stabilization plan.

Rosewell Ruins (exterior surfaces)

Rosewell Documentation (exterior surfaces)