Tag Archives: measured drawings

Progress at the North Carolina State Capitol

At this writing, Aaslestad Preservation Consulting, llc is in the middle of a project to document the NC State Capitol building (1840) in Raleigh. The exterior surfaces are being documented both in line drawing and hybrid imagery. When this is wrapped up, the interiors will be given a similar treatment. These drawings will then be augmented by a series of detail drawings capturing the many rooms’ unique door and window profiles, friezes and such. Stay tuned!

Line Drawing indicating the individual stones that compose the facade.

Line Drawing indicating the individual stones that compose the facade.

Hybrid Drawing incorporating rectified photographs of the individual stones that compose the facade into the line drawing.

Hybrid Drawing incorporating rectified photographs of the individual stones that compose the facade into the line drawing. Note that the patches of sunlight shown here are a little confusing. This will have to be re-shot under better light conditions.

Some obstruction with regard to adjacent vegetation...

Some obstruction with regard to adjacent vegetation…

 

In this sheet, a new shot of the column will be required...

In this sheet, a new shot of the column will be required…

The dome is not safely accessible on all 8 sides; shown here are the three types of elevation (beneath the dome itself) that are repeated)

The dome is not safely accessible on all 8 sides; shown here are the three types of elevation (beneath the dome itself) that are repeated)

 

 

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War Memorial Auditorium (Progress)

War Memorial Auditorium - Nashville, TN

Earlier this month I travelled to Nashville to shoot photos of this gorgeous classical structure erected by the State of Tennessee, the City of Nashville and Davidson County in 1923 (immediately following the first World War). Nashville Architect Edward Dougherty won a Gold medal for the design from the AIA in 1925. From 1939 to 1943 the building served as the fourth home to the Grand Old Opry and witnessed the induction of Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe, and Minnie Pearl.

Today the War Memorial Auditorium is still in use as a music venue as well as offices for the State of Tennessee. To support an effort to preserve the building I am preparing measured drawings to cover the all of its exterior envelope. My line drawings will be enriched with rectified photography. Here is a sample (in progress) of a courtyard elevation.

Courtyard Elevation (in progress) in AutoCAD drawing software

Here are two more screen shots that show some of the rectified photographs (on separate drawing layers) that are “thawed”:

In progress DWG file with 2 of 4 layers bearing rectified photography thawed

In progress DWG file with remaining layers bearing rectified photography thawed

In the end, my drawing set will be organized across at least eight E sized sheets prepared for plotting at 1/4″=1′-0″ (or 1:48) .

If you want to see the drawings completed, stay tuned/subscribe!

Envelope Plans

Envelope Plan

An envelope plan is a delineation of the extent of a building’s mass taken at a fixed elevation. It establishes a precise limit to the outermost profile of the building. Envelope plans are easily derived from photogrammetric surveys and point clouds that decribe the exterior conditions of a building.

The value of the envelope plan should not be overlooked. When charged with creating plan drawings of a building, the envelope plan is the first place to start. It provides a reliable framework against which any data from an interior survey can be compared – significantly reducing the occurrence of human error when constructing a detailed floor plan drawings depicting interior layouts.

When possible, I use data from photogrammetry to prepare envelope plans before I go inside a structure to collect additional observations. By establishing accurate envelope conditions, previously mysterious internal conditions that might have been otherwise unmeasurable (such as wall thicknesses) can then be reliably calculated.

Developed floor plan

An envelope plan is especially valuable for non orthogonal structures. For some projects when I am collaborating with a team of architects who are close by to a project site, I prepare the envelope plan using photogrammetry and then hand it off to my colleagues who will complete the drawing during subsequent visits to the building. It is a great way to eliminate questions that arise amid a wealth of (sometimes) confusing field notes and measurements.

The Carnegie Library - Atlantic City, NJ

As found drawings

"As Found"

There is a distinction between “as found” drawings (drawings that depict the reality of an existing building as it is “found” today) and drawings that were “found” in a search to locate historical documentation about a building. This is not to knock the value of original drawings that are sometimes available when working on an historic structure. Its just a reminder that original drawings do not always provide accurate descriptions of what was built. Depending on when and how the building was constructed, design drawings sometimes were more like polite suggestions.

The other issue with “found” drawings is how they are converted into CAD drawings or BIM models. Care must be taken to avoid a messy foundation for preservation work.

Federal Triangle

USC/CW/ICC Modernization 1994
The Arthur Mellon Auditorium (ICC Building) 1994

Here is a composite drawing of the first really huge (HUGE) building that i used photogrammetry to measure and draw back in 1994.  This work was completed with Ben Frombgen at IAT when we were based in New Haven, CT. We did a complete set of elevations, eleven building profiles (that were later turned into building sections by our client, RTKL) plus a window schedule. It hurts for me to remember how little we charged for this work!  But it was one of our first big commissions and it seemed like a lot at the time.

This is also the first project on which I used a laser measuring device.  If I recall correctly, we were asked to deliver this project in metric units.  I remember being thrilled that the Leica Disto that we bought back then (which was as big as a large box of spaghetti) could switch between units.

I remember also that we had access to a great set of San Francisco based architect Arthur Brown Jr.’s original design drawings (from the 30’s) that were just stunningly beautiful and provided such a contrast to the general level of quality in CAD drafting at the time. Not only was the quality of drafting so great (a beautiful hierarchy of line weights, crisp fluid clarity of description) but the organization of the drawing set was so intelligent and efficient.  We resolved to find a way to draw as well with a computer and have been trying to do so since!

Arthur Brown Jr. also designed the san Francisco City Hall and Coit Tower.

Childs Restaurant -2

Sheet 1 with rectified images "thawed"

Sheet 2 with rectified images "frozen"

Childs Restaurant

Sheet 3 with some rectified images "thawed", others "frozen"

Traylor Hall – Mercersburg Academy

The Provident Mutual Insurance Building (2)

The Provident Mutual Insurance Building

This facade was captured and rendered into a single measured line drawing, enhanced by four additional sheets bearing a mosaic of rectified photographs to convery additional detail about the building’s existing conditions.

New York Times

New York Times May 4 1995

from the New York Times May 4 1995

This article about the rejuvenation of the Williamsburg Savings Bank in Brooklyn featured a line drawing that was created with the aid of photogrammetry. Unfortunately the article presents the drawing only as “George B. Post’s winning design” and did not mention that is was made by Ben Frombgen and myself.  Oh well, after all we didn’t design it!

Federal Triangle

USC/CW/ICC Modernization 1994

The Arthur Mellon Auditorium (ICC Building) 1994

Here is a composite drawing of the first really huge (HUGE) building that i used photogrammetry to measure and draw back in 1994.  This work was completed with Ben Frombgen at IAT when we were based in New Haven, CT. We did a complete set of elevations, eleven building profiles (that were later turned into building sections by our client, RTKL) plus a window schedule. It hurts for me to remember how little we charged for this work!  But it was one of our first big commissions and it seemed like a lot at the time.

This is also the first project on which I used a laser measuring device.  If I recall correctly, we were asked to deliver this project in metric units.  I remember being thrilled that the Leica Disto that we bought back then (which was as big as a large box of spaghetti) could switch between units.

I remember also that we had access to a great set of San Francisco based architect Arthur Brown Jr.’s original design drawings (from the 30’s) that were just stunningly beautiful and provided such a contrast to the general level of quality in CAD drafting at the time. Not only was the quality of drafting so great (a beautiful hierarchy of line weights, crisp fluid clarity of description) but the organization of the drawing set was so intelligent and efficient.  We resolved to find a way to draw as well with a computer and have been trying to do so since!

Arthur Brown Jr. also designed the san Francisco City Hall and Coit Tower.