Category Archives: photogrammetry

Adjustable scan resolution

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The Alamo and more

The Alamo

The Alamo

I have been neglecting updates on my website, even though I’ve been doing some interesting work!

2016 has been extremely busy with large projects at the Biltmore in Asheville, NC and in San Antonio, TX (above). I’ve also had a chance to do some design work for two restaurant installations here in Virginia – “The Store” and “Chicano Boy”.

Plus I had a nice show of photographs of Portsmouth Island, NC that has been hanging in Ocracoke all summer.

That’s all for now – just wanted to post something ūüėČ

Aerial Photography > Dense Point Clouds

Since 2009 I’ve done a fair amount of work with aerial photography, all the while continuing to explore architectural photography and photogrammetry while on the ground. I’ve tried in the past with some success to merge the two things but have found the results to be lacking something. That something, I think, is the hyper dense point cloud – and now I have it pretty much figured out.

Below are tow animated GIF images showing first the point cloud describing our local hospital (which I was contracted to cover with aerial photographs a few years back) and the second is a textured 3-D model of the scan.

Its so amazing¬†to think that the flight over this structure can be reconstructed virtually a few years later with even more options to “fly around”…

Dense Point Cloud

Dense Point Cloud

Textured 3-D model

Textured 3-D model

Orthophotos from a Dense Point Cloud

45 degrees

45 degrees

RCP

RCP

on axis

on axis

45 degrees

45 degrees

on axis

on axis

Luzerne County Courthouse

Luzerne County Courthouse

Civil Rights Memorial

The Civil Rights Memorial in Richmond, VA

The Civil Rights Memorial in Richmond, VA

Enriching HABS documentation with Orthophotography

HYBRIDIZED 00001a 1 When I am hired to prepare a set of documents to describe the existing conditions of buildings I sometimes try to incorporate older drawings and the like. If I am working with original construction drawings it can be very interesting to see how and where the existing structure is different than the one designed. If I am working with measured drawings of unknown provenance it can be very frustrating to see how inaccurate the drawings are! So as a rule, I only deliver measured drawings that I create from my original site work  since its the only way I know that I can really trust the work and stand behind it.

Hybrid Drawing

Hybrid Drawing

Line Drawing

Line Drawing

Realizing how valuable a good set of measured drawings truly is, it is wonderful to consider¬†what a treasure our HABS HAER collections are! These are uniformly drawn to standards generally higher than the profession gets by on, even today. Sometimes I am looking at doing some work on a project and I am fortunate to learn that a HABS set of drawings already exist. This gives me an opportunity to overlay some of my work (with photogrammetrically derived images) onto this “layer” of information in seamless fashion.

Hybrid Drawing

Hybrid Drawing

Line Drawing

Line Drawing

I’ve long done this kind of work with rectified photography in a sort of manual approach. I’m discovering that its equally great to “Hybridize” the HABS line drawings¬†with orthophotography as well (derived from 3-D models derived from a scanning process). The images posted here show a recent look at the Cape Hatteras lighthouse on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. The HABS collection of drawings is very nicely done and available to all to explore through the HABS web site (here). The images posted here show how the line drawings can be built upon with technology available today,¬†¬†They become the¬†foundational layer of a living document that describes¬†an important piece of architecture in great detail.


 

07hatteras base E

05hatteras base S03hatteras base W01hatteras base N

The Clocktower Building in Staunton, VA

Three views of a model of this iconic corner building

Three views of a model of this iconic corner building

Just a quick share of the results of a test project to evaluate some new technology. Check out the video below to see all three views above in their 3D context.

Measuring the deformation of masonry walls in an historic structure

Contour map of deformation SE

Contour map of deformation SE

For my project at the the Old Town Hall in New Castle, DE, I am first establishing the existing conditions of masonry walls – including their deformation. This documentation will help us to choose where to set targets for monitoring over the coming months/years.

Contour map of deformation NW

Contour map of deformation NW

see the project page HERE

New way to use Photogrammetry

Model of addition projected back into photograph

Typically I use photogrammetry to measure and draw existing structures. ¬†Recently I’ve started using it also to visualize new structures. The photo above shows an image that was used originally to create a set of measured drawings of an existing house. ¬†Once I had those drawings completed I designed a new structure to be built above the foundation of an existing garage. ¬†I made a simple 3-D model of the new design and then accurately projected the model back into the photograph. This has been an invaluable tool in getting my client to understand the new design.

More on this new way of working to come…

Alternate view

Saline Royal – Claude-Nicolas Ledoux

Aerial view of Ledoux's Royal Saltworks

This set of buildings located in Arcs-et-Senans (Franche-Comte) is incredibly interesting to anyone with an interest in Thomas Jefferson and/or enlightenment age architecture – notably so since it was not only constructed at the time it was built but is restored and available to the public.

Maison du Directeur (2010)

A lot of information on the Royal Saltworks is available both here and here. Ledoux’s influence on Jefferson is well documented and in evidence in most of his projects. ¬†On Jefferson’s Academical Village at the University of Virginia, Ledoux is even “quoted” in one pavilion. ¬†But the greater feeling one gets when visiting Ledoux’s Royal Saltworks in Arcs-et-Senans (also a UNESCO World Heritage Site) is the unmistakable kindred spirit between these two architects – their mutual conviction that philosophy and architecture share a link greater than building and commerce.

Point Cloud of the Maison Du Directeur

point cloud "elevation" (perspective removed)

a link to a panoramic view from the “Maison du Directeur” (looking outward) can be found¬†here.

rectified photo of the Maison du Directeur

As can be seen in the drawing below, the full design was never fully realized. The “gabelle” or salt tax, was rather unpopular during the time of the French Revolution -making the entire idea of an “ideal city” rather remote.

Saline Royale, Claude-Nicolas Ledoux