3D Scanning of sculpture at Kykuit

The Rose Garden Fountain at Kykuit

The Rose Garden Fountain at Kykuit

I used a series of calibrated photographs of this sculpture to create the basis for documentation of this sculptural fountain about five years ago. At that time I was able to make reasonably detailed drawings of the fountain’s architectural features and – if needed – I could provide accurate 3D point measurements of any point of the stone surface.

More recently I went back to the photos and reprocessed them photogrammetrically to create a more enhanced description of the fountain in the form of a high density point cloud, mesh and 3D model. The video above ^ shows the model of the entire fountain in these various formats.

The video below shows the upper portion of the model in a little greater detail.

This work was conducted to provide for documentation of this work of art so that a replacement could be made in case the original was damaged through structural failure or catastrophic event.

Byproducts of the three dimensional model include accurate orthophotography depicting the model in plan and elevation. see below…

Plan View of the fountain

Plan View of the fountain

Orthophoto of the fountain in its entirety

Orthophoto of the fountain in its entirety

Orthophoto of the upper portion of the fountain

Orthophoto of the upper portion of the fountain

Detail of damaged portion of the fountain

Detail of damaged portion of the fountain

A Comparison of Orthophotography and Mosaics of Rectified Photographs

In 2012 I prepared documentation of the masonry surfaces of this historic room in the Maryland Statehouse. This documentation provided a baseline of the existing conditions to allow for an investigation into how exactly the room was appointed in its heyday – when Thomas Jefferson was named ambassador to France etc…

The documentation that I created consisted of measured line drawings (in CAD format) augmented by a mosaic of photographs that had been rectified to match the real world size and shape of the various portions of masonry. here is what it looked like:

Measured Line Drawing

Measured Line Drawing

The image above ^ shows a screen capture of an accurate measured line drawing delineating the limits of the masonry surfaces and indicating the architectural features nearby.

Key to regions/individual rectified photographs

Key to regions/individual rectified photographs

This image ^ shows a drawing layer “thawed” to display a sort of key plan to the different regions of masonry for which individual rectified photographs were prepared. The next few images show some of the drawing layers containing these rectified photographs “thawed” and you can get an idea of how the composite whole is constructed like a mosaic.

A few rectified photographs thawed...

A few rectified photographs thawed…

a few more rectified photographs thawed...

a few more rectified photographs thawed…

A single rectified photo of the entire wall

A single rectified photo of the entire wall

So, the above image ^ shows how the entire wall could be captured, rectified, and brought into the measured drawing. (The reason that the other images were created in “panels” was to provide for two things: (1) enhanced resolution for the individual photographs, and (2) the ability to “see around” obstacles presented to a single point of view. For example, in the image above, portions of the masonry surface are obscured by some of the architectural detailing/millwork)

Below is a “zoomed in” version showing this condition in higher detail…

When a single image is rectified so that the masonry portions of the image match the real world size and shape of what is being depicted, features that are NOT co planar can be distorted, not matching real world conditions. This is one reason a mosaic approach was needed to cover all of the surfaces in question  accurately.

When a single image is rectified so that the masonry portions of the image match the real world size and shape of what is being depicted, features that are NOT co planar can be distorted, not matching real world conditions. This is one reason a mosaic approach was needed to cover all of the surfaces in question accurately.

So, in this approach, the line drawings carried the responsibility of delineating the wall’s size, shape and configuration of architectural elements while the rectified photos carried the responsibility of conveying the lay out and character of the masonry construction units.

Today, I might approach the project differently, using a true “Orthophoto” of the sucrose instead of a mosaic. The distinction is important. An Orthophoto is a planar projection of a dense point cloud or textured mesh 3D model. I was unable to create these back in 2012 when I did this work – but today I can do so -still using photogrammetry- and maintain the same level of accuracy demanded by such work.

An Orthophoto (constructed from images from various points of view) depicts the masonry surfaces as well as the architectural detailing/millwork accurately.

An Orthophoto (constructed from images from various points of view) depicts the masonry surfaces as well as the architectural detailing/millwork accurately.

This image ^ shows the orthophoto seated nicely behind the measured line drawings. As mentioned above, it is a projection from a 3D model, which can be looked at from a variety of angles and manipulated in 3D modeling software . below is a video clip showing the model these surfaces.

I am really excited to have this new set of tools at my disposal! The mosaic approach is still sound and may be more appropriate for some projects. In fact, the two approaches can coexist in the same set of documentation if needed. But the addition of 3D scanning and the creation of true Orthophotos to my toolbag will allow me to provide architects and engineers faced with complex preservation challenges with more options.

West Wall of the Old Senate Chamber - Orthophoto

West Wall of the Old Senate Chamber – Orthophoto

more background info here:

New Project Page for New Castle Town Hall

Measured Drawing (left) and Orthophotography (right)

Measured Drawing (left) and Orthophotography (right)

I have started a monitoring project to determine whether or not the masonry in the “Old Town Hall” building in New Castle, DE. In order to create base line documentation I have created a set of drawings and ortho photos. I’ll be returning to the structure quarterly to remeasure specific target locations to develop an opinion about the health of two of the buildings masonry walls.

Back to Vladivostok

another look at the same block featuring GUM

another look at the same block featuring GUM

A few years ago I helped an international team off architects and planners to survey the entire historic district of the city of Vladivostok, Russia’s ‘warm water port’ on the Japan Sea. See here and here.

Recently I went back to my old photos to see how they’d fare as input into my new(ish) methodology for creating oath photos. While they were NOT shot in a manner consistent with the appropriate protocol for the new methodology – they still work out.

I’m still learning a lot about screen capture video and what not, so this clip is a little shaky, but here is a closer view of the ortho photo:

Orthophotos extracted from Point cloud: Arc de Triomphe, Paris

Photo of the Arc de Triomphe from the street

Photo of the Arc de Triomphe from the street

This magnificent structure from the early 19th century is one of Paris’ defining landmarks. It measures 50m high x 45m wide x 22m deep (164′ x 148′ x 72′). In other words, it’s HUGE!

And gorgeously detailed.

Almost five years ago I shot a series of images of this structure with the intention of creating a high density point cloud and 3D model of the arch -but I’ve had to wait until his year to have the wherewithal required to do so. Here are some snap shots of the model…

East side (0rthophoto)

East side (0rthophoto)

West Side (Orthophoto)

West Side (Orthophoto)

Reflected Ceiling Plan of vaults

Reflected Ceiling Plan of vaults

A little closer

A little closer

A little closer

A little closer

and a little closer.

and a little closer!

Frieze detail from side

Frieze detail from side

Frieze detail sample snapshot

Frieze detail from other side

a little closer

a little closer

snapshot

snapshot

snapshot

snapshot

Mind you, I calculated this model relatively “low res”. The model is an “overview” and any individual portion can be scanned at higher resolution.

Photographs were shot using a 40mm lens on a full frame digital SLR body.

 

High Density Point Clouds from Photogrammetry

Ceiling at the  Cosmo Club Ballroom (much reduced)

Ceiling at the Cosmo Club Ballroom (much reduced)

I’ve taken some slow time at Christmas to make some improvements and to do some training and its paying off. Next year will see some interesting stuff as I am getting high density point clouds and a smarter sort of orthophotography more integrated into my workflow.

Over the  Christmas break I’ve been going back and looking at some older projects to see what I can do with them with what I’ll be able to do in 2015.

Watch this space, I’ll be sharing some cool experiments!

cropped center portion

cropped center portion

detail (full resolution for this experiment... could go higher!)

detail (full resolution for this experiment… could go higher!)

Terra Cotta Modelling

front, side, and perspective views of model/point cloud derived from photogrammetry

front, side, and perspective views of model/point cloud derived from photogrammetry

A few screen shots to share from some of the work I’ve been doing integrating “traditional photogrammetry” with dense point cloud modelling.

orthophoto

orthophoto

 

orthophoto detail

orthophoto detail

Park Avenue Armory – Veterans Room

"zoomed in" view

“zoomed in” view

Original finish by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Original finish by Louis Comfort Tiffany

(Link to original project page: here)

Entire Wall

After documenting this building extensively seven years ago, the restoration team at the Armory invited me back to create rectified photographs of this recently uncovered surface in the veterans room – it was beneath a large, heavy painting. Previously, researchers had seen what looked in historic photographs to be a wall paper motif/design and taken this to be part of the original design by Louis Comfort Tiffany. In fact, the discovery of this surface shows that the repeating pattern was a hand painted motif – not wall paper. The rectified photo mosaic that I created describing the surface at try scale provides a basis for discovering what the original stencil looks like.

New media added to Temple Beth-El project page

Temple-Beth-El_OCT11 eighth (elevations)

Measured Line drawings of the building’s exterior elevations

ELSP_129terra cotta surround at entry

ELSP_149partial side elevation

ELSP_295interior view

ELSP_307skylight

 

New page for the Stone House

link here.

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Measured Line drawings of the building’s plan and hybrid drawings of the building’s exterior.

P2

P2

P2

P2

P2

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P2

P2

P2

 

also: here is a blog post from my client

http://newtownhistorycenter.org/stone-house-restoration-project/hybrid-drawings/