Fayette County Courthouse

The Fayette County Courthouse in Lexington, KY used to look like this…

Fayette County Courthouse

Fayette County Courthouse

… but around 1961 the arched windows on the third floor were removed as part of a ‘renovation’ which has nearly destroyed the building’s integrity. It only gets worse as you go inside. Luckily there is an effort to treat this gem in downtown Lexington a little better. I was engaged to document the exterior in both rectified photography and line drawing. At present I am still working on the drawings, but I’ve pretty much wrapped up the rectified photography.

 

West Elevation

West Elevation

North Elevation

South Elevation

North Elevation

North Elevation

And a line drawing:

Line drawing of West Elevation (pdf print in negative)

Line drawing of West Elevation (pdf print in negative)

One response to “Fayette County Courthouse

  1. Pingback: Kentucky | photography & architectural photogrammetry

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The New Jersey Statehouse

During late winter into spring I was part of a team of architects, engineers and consultants charged with an extensive survey of exterior envelope of the state capitol building in Trenton, NJ.  I will share images of the project once approved by the team leader.

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The Westory Building in Washington, DC

found drawings

found drawings

It goes without saying that tall buildings can pose a problem for architectural surveying – not just in conducting the survey itself, but first off in acquiring accurate, reliable documentation needed in order to record the survey. A lot of times this problem is “half solved” by relying on found documents from previous  surveys or old drawings, even copies of original construction documents. I call it a “half solution” because while it solves some question, it often poses as many a it answers… Such as: “do these drawings really reflect the way the building stands today?”, or  “did they really build it the way it was designed?”.

capital detail

capital detail

Of course, photogrammetry, laser surveying, and other new technologies can go a long way towards addressing these questions by providing excellent means to measure and draw complex surfaces from a distance. But tall buildings can still pose difficulties because you still need to get the camera or laser station in the right place in order to record relevant information. Sometimes this means renting an aerial lift of some sort, if available. Other times, we can get the camera/device into the right spot by using adjacent buildings for station points. And with photogrammetry we can also use long lenses to grab details from afar, which was the case when I surveyed the Westory Building in Washington DC. This  project included ground shots, adjacent building shots, and long lens shots made possible by the fact that the building is located on the corner of a block.

rectified photograph

rectified photograph

The drawings and images shown here, then, were given to my client (Wiss Janey Elstner) who now are conducting a hands-on survey of this ornate terra cotta facade from swing stages. In this way, they are able to give their full attention to assessing and recording building conditions since they can trust that the drawings are both contemporary, accurate, and richly detailed.

measured drawing

measured drawing

measured drawing with rectified photograph

measured drawing with rectified photograph

detail from previous panel

detail from previous panel

detail of edge condition

detail of edge condition

bracket detail

bracket detail

corner condition

corner condition

detail

detail

detail

detail

Finally, below is a rectified photograph shot from the roof top of the building across the street. This, too was integrated into the set of measured drawings.

upper story capture

upper story capture

One response to “The Westory Building in Washington, DC

  1. Pingback: New Project page: The Westory Building | photography & architectural photogrammetry

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The North Carolina State Capitol

also look here.

Progress slides:

Composite of 4 plans along two lines of symmetry

Composite of 4 plans along two lines of symmetry

similarities vs. differences

similarities vs. differences

The Senate Chamber

The Senate Chamber

Ceiling to the Senate Chamber

Ceiling to the Senate Chamber

Hybrid Drawing: several panels of rectified photographic imagery organized spatially by a vector line drawing in AutoCAD

Hybrid Drawing: several panels of rectified photographic imagery organized spatially by a vector line drawing in AutoCAD

One response to “The North Carolina State Capitol

  1. Pingback: NC State Capitol progress slides | photography & architectural photogrammetry

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The Old Senate Chamber at the Maryland State Capitol

<<under construction>>

meanwhile look here

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Kykuit

Fountain, sculpture, mosaic paving at Kykuit

A variety of photos were taken in order to capture the architectural- and sculptural features that compose this fountain located on the grounds of the Rockefeller estate on the lower Hudson, just north of New York City, known as Kykuit.

Below are some screen shots of the point cloud in plan and elevation. Click on the images to see them in higher resolution.

Point Cloud Elevation
Point Cloud Plan

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War Memorial Auditorium (Nashville)

The War Memorial Auditorium (rear elevation)In October 2011 I travelled to Nashville to shoot photos of this gorgeous classical structure erected by the State of Tennessee, the City of Nashville and Davidson County in 1923 (immediately following the first World War). Nashville Architect Edward Dougherty won a Gold medal for the design from the AIA in 1925. From 1939 to 1943 the building served as the fourth home to the Grand Old Opry and witnessed the induction of Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe, and Minnie Pearl.

Today the War Memorial Auditorium is still in use as a music venue as well as offices for the State of Tennessee. To support an effort to preserve the building I am preparing measured drawings to cover the all of its exterior envelope. My line drawings will be enriched with rectified photography. Below are a series of photos and drawings selected from the set of deliverables given to my client.

View from the central courtyard

Interior view, Propylaea

Reflected Ceiling Plan

...with the Tennessee Tower in view beyond

The complete drawing set was organized across at least eight E sized sheets prepared for plotting at 1/4″=1′-0″ (or 1:48) .

War Memorial Auditorium, Nashville Tennessee: Aaslestad Preservation Consulting, photogrammetry, measured drawings

One response to “War Memorial Auditorium (Nashville)

  1. Pingback: Updated War Memorial Auditorium project page | photography & architectural photogrammetry

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Fort Sumter

Exterior Masonry at Fort Sumter, Charleston, SC

After shooting a series of photographs of the old Southern stronghold in October I’ve just completed a set of forty seven tabloid size sheets that capture and represent the existing conditions of the exterior walls and courtyard elevations. These will be used later in the year as the basis for a study that will clearly distinguish different periods of masonry and masonry infill in order to create a viable preservation plan.

Scal-able Photographs of the Entry to Fort Sumter
Rectified Photographs of the Fort’s interior elevations

The drawings and rectified images (hybrid drawings) are laid out for plotting at the architectural scale of 1/4″=1′-0″ – but can be printed at larger scales if needed.

Detail View (can be enlarged further)
Scope of Work / Key Plan

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30403 Coffee Table (Design Collaboration)

The 30403 Coffee Table

To be clear right away: this design is totally owned by Ryan Wickre of Fixed Design in San Francisco. I only played a bit part in getting the design from idea to realization.

The story goes more or less like this: Ryan acquired a magnificent slab of Oregon Myrtle with a gorgeous grain that would lend itself well to being “bookmatched”, or split into two and then joined along an axis to create a sort of mirrored effect. he decided to make this into a table whose base would match the exact profile of the irregular slab.

The bookmatched Oregon Myrtle slab

Ryan contacted me when he sought a way to create a precise measured drawing of the slab’s irregular shape that would control or guide the cutting of the steel slab that would lie under the table. We brainstormed over this idea a bit and decided to give a try for me to create these drawings using photogrammetry based on shots taken with his camera gear (budget did not allow for flying me and my gear to California). If the results were not close enough, we’d try another method.

The slab's irregular shape

So I describe how I wanted Ryan to shoot the photos and he sent them to me; meanwhile I obtained the nominal specs for his gear and set up some parameters for photogrammetric analysis.  The results from my end looked really good (statistically). The test would come once Ryan compared a full size print to the real thing.

Comparison of my rectified image (printed full scale) to the slab of Myrtle

The comparison proved that the analysis met or exceeded Ryan’s requirements for accuracy – even with just nominal specs for an uncalibrated camera!  And so we went no further (we had considered him sending me his camera for calibration, or hiring a CA based architect/friend/colleague with a calibrated camera etc…)

Below are a couple of shots of the Ryan explaining “bookmatching” to a young visitor to  the Fixed Design stand at “Dwell on Design” summer 2011:

"like this..."

"...and then like this"

A few more shots:

Oregon Myrtle slab with matching stainless steel base

The reflection displays the underside of the slab

All photos by (c)2011 Ryan Wickre, used with permission.

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Usage / Licensing of Photographs

As the sole creator of his work, Peter Aaslestad remains sole owner of all copyrights for the photographs, drawings, and hybrid/composite images he produces – even after the sale of one of his works. When an image is purchased, what is actually happening is that Peter becomes “licensor” to the buyer who becomes the “licensee”. Understanding how Photo Usage Licensing works can be important because its dynamics affect the pricing of the works and the responsibilities of each party involved.

If you want to purchase an image from Peter, please describe precisely how you intend to use the image(s). Peter will then draft an appropriate license agreement and determine a price. Once the terms are agreed upon the images will be sent via CD/email/internet along with an invoice. Payments can also be made using major credit cards.

link to Sample Usage Agreement (pdf)

Exclusivity: Photo Usage Licenses can be first divided into two types of licenses: exclusive and non-exclusive.

  • An Exclusive license provides the buyer/licensee with an assurance that the same image will not be licensed to any third party for the duration of the agreement. Understandably these are the most expensive type of licenses since they deprive Peter from third party sales.
  • A Non-Exclusive license allows Peter to sell additional licenses of the same image to other parties under separate agreements. This is the default condition of sale.

Extent of Usage: Photo Usage Licenses can be further characterized by the extent of usage allowed by each license – as either a one time use in a specified media or as an extended use in a variety of media over a period of time.

  • One time Use License Agreements for Digital Images: This licensing arrangement provides the buyer/licensee with the right to use an image for any commercial, personal, non-profit or editorial projects involving advertising, print media, web site publication, or broadcast for a single instance. In this case, the licensing agreement will specify the extent of the image’s usage – whether it will be printed in a newsletter, newspaper or billboard – or shared on a website etc. Also included in the agreement (and affecting the price of the license) will be the number of copies being made (for print media) or duration that the image is to be posted (for web media). Any additional printing runs or featuring of the images on the web will require an additional license agreement. Since this arrangement is the most tightly controlled, it is also the cheapest.
  • Extended Use License Agreements for Digital Images: This licensing arrangement gives greater freedom to the buyer/licensee. It allows the usage of the purchased image(s) in any commercial, personal, non-profit or editorial projects involving advertising, print media, web site publication, or broadcast for an extended period of time. Typically this time period is one to five years, but can be longer. During this time, the buyer/licensee is free to print, publish, distribute the purchased image(s) without restriction in a variety of media – even simultaneously – without need to procure additional licensing agreements. The only restriction to this license other than a reasonable time limit is that it is not transferrable to a third party.  If one party purchases images that a third party would like to use as well, the third party will have to procure a separate license agreement from Peter.

Bulk Discounts: Also affecting the price of image usage licensing agreements is the number of images to be licensed. When  Peter negotiates a license agreement for his work, he will typically license a batch of images at a per-image-rate 10-20 percent lower than a single image.

Copyright and Credit: Implicit to any licensing agreement is the buyer/license’s agreement to credit the owner of the copyright (Peter Aaslestad) whenever any image is used.  No copyright or intellectual property is transferred at any point to the buyer/licensee. When possible, Peter will appreciate photo credits to include not only his name but a link to his web site: aaslestad.com.

Prints: Prints are sold “as is” and become the physical property of the buyer post sale. The images borne by the prints, however, is are still protected by copyright and may not be altered or reproduced without written approval from Peter.

Exclusive Prints: On occasion, Peter will create a series of prints of a selected image with the understanding that once this series is printed and presented for sale, no other prints form the same film negative/digital file shall be made available. In this way the print, or series of prints, can be considered “exclusive”.

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